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Analog Science Fiction and Fact - September 2013: A Guide for Science Fiction and Fact Lovers


Analog Science Fiction and Fact - September 2013




If you are a fan of science fiction and fact, you might want to check out the September 2013 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, one of the longest-running and most respected magazines in the genre. In this article, I will give you an overview of what this issue has to offer, including summaries and analyses of the stories, as well as some reasons why you should read it.




Analog Science Fiction and Fact - September 2013


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Introduction




What is Analog Science Fiction and Fact?




Analog Science Fiction and Fact is a monthly magazine that publishes original stories, articles, editorials, reviews, and features related to science fiction and fact. It was founded in 1930 as Astounding Stories, and later renamed Astounding Science Fiction in 1938. In 1960, it changed its name to Analog Science Fiction and Fact to reflect its focus on realistic and scientifically accurate stories. It is currently edited by Trevor Quachri, who took over from Stanley Schmidt in 2012.


What are the features of the September 2013 issue?




The September 2013 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact contains a cover story, a novella, two novelettes, five short stories, a science fact article, a guest editorial, a book review column, a poetry page, a reader's department, and an index. The cover art is by Vincent Di Fate, depicting a scene from the cover story "The Fountain of Neptune" by Rajnar Vajra. The science fact article is by Richard A. Lovett, titled "The Goldilocks Zone: Why Earth Is Just Right for Life". The guest editorial is by Edward M. Lerner, titled "Paradise Lost". The book review column is by Don Sakers, titled "The Reference Library". The poetry page features two poems by Robert Frazier and Bruce Boston. The reader's department includes letters from readers, an analytical laboratory ballot for voting on the best stories of the previous year, an upcoming events calendar, and a brass tacks section for comments on current issues.


Main Content




The cover story: "The Fountain of Neptune" by Rajnar Vajra




Summary




"The Fountain of Neptune" is a science fiction adventure story set in the year 2067. It follows the exploits of a team of explorers who are sent to investigate a mysterious phenomenon on Neptune's moon Triton. They discover that Triton has a hidden ocean beneath its icy surface, and that there is a huge fountain of water erupting from its south pole. They also encounter a hostile alien life form that tries to stop them from reaching the fountain. Along the way, they face various dangers and challenges, such as extreme cold, low gravity, radiation, and sabotage. The story is told from the perspective of the team leader, Captain Jana Koslova, a former Russian cosmonaut who has a personal stake in the mission.


Analysis




"The Fountain of Neptune" is a thrilling and imaginative story that combines hard science fiction with elements of mystery, horror, and humor. The author, Rajnar Vajra, is a veteran writer who has been publishing stories in Analog Science Fiction and Fact since 1998. He is known for his inventive and diverse plots, his vivid and realistic characters, and his witty and engaging style. In this story, he creates a fascinating and plausible scenario of exploring Triton, one of the most intriguing and mysterious worlds in the solar system. He also introduces a unique and menacing alien creature that poses a serious threat to the human explorers. The story is full of action, suspense, and surprises, as well as some humorous and touching moments. The story also raises some interesting questions about the nature and origin of life in the universe, and the ethical and moral implications of encountering it.


The novella: "The Final Nail" by Stanley Schmidt




Summary




"The Final Nail" is a science fiction mystery story set in the near future. It revolves around the case of a mysterious murder that occurs in a space station orbiting Earth. The victim is Dr. Roberta King, a renowned physicist who was working on a revolutionary project involving quantum entanglement and teleportation. The suspect is Dr. David Nash, her colleague and lover, who was found unconscious next to her body with a bloody nail in his hand. The investigator is Lieutenant Frank Corso, a former astronaut who is now a space cop. He has to find out what really happened in the space station, and whether Nash is guilty or innocent. He also has to deal with his own personal issues, such as his estranged wife, his troubled son, and his fear of heights.


Analysis




"The Final Nail" is a clever and intriguing story that blends science fiction with classic detective fiction. The author, Stanley Schmidt, is the former editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, who retired in 2012 after 34 years of service. He is also an accomplished writer who has published several novels and short stories in various genres. He is known for his rigorous and realistic approach to science fiction, his complex and believable characters, and his subtle and sophisticated humor. In this story, he creates a compelling and realistic scenario of living and working in space, as well as a challenging and puzzling mystery that involves cutting-edge physics and technology. He also develops a sympathetic and flawed protagonist who has to overcome his own demons while solving the case. The story is full of twists and turns, as well as some emotional and philosophical insights.


The novelettes: "The Precedent" by Sean McMullen and "The Wreck of the Mars Adventure" by David D. Levine




Summary and analysis of "The Precedent"




"The Precedent" is a science fiction alternate history story set in the year 1945. It imagines what would have happened if Nazi Germany had developed atomic bombs before the Allies, and had used them to bomb London and Moscow. The story follows the aftermath of this event from the perspective of two characters: Winston Churchill, the Prime Minister of Britain, who has to decide whether to surrender or fight on; and Albert Einstein, the famous physicist who has been kidnapped by the Nazis and forced to work on their nuclear program. The story explores how these two men cope with their dilemmas, how they interact with each other, and how they influence history.


"The Precedent" is a fascinating and thought-provoking story that examines one of the most pivotal moments in history from a different angle. The author, Sean McMullen, is an Australian writer who has been publishing stories in Analog Science Fiction and Fact since 1990. He is known for his original and imaginative plots, his meticulous research and historical accuracy, and his vivid and authentic characters. In this story, he creates a plausible and terrifying scenario of what could have been if Nazi Germany had won the nuclear race. He also portrays two iconic figures of history with respect and realism, showing their strengths and weaknesses, their hopes and fears, their courage and despair. The story is full of tension, drama, and irony, as well as some surprising revelations.


Summary and analysis of "The Wreck of the Mars Adventure"




if Isaac Newton had built a spaceship and launched a mission to Mars. The story follows the adventures of Captain William Kidd, a notorious pirate who has been hired by Newton to pilot the spaceship, and his crew of misfits and outcasts. They encounter various obstacles and dangers on their way to Mars, such as storms, mutiny, enemy ships, and alien creatures. They also discover some secrets and mysteries about the red planet and its inhabitants.


"The Wreck of the Mars Adventure" is a fun and exciting story that mixes science fiction with historical fiction and fantasy. The author, David D. Levine, is an American writer who has been publishing stories in Analog Science Fiction and Fact since 2001. He is known for his creative and humorous plots, his colorful and quirky characters, and his lively and witty style. In this story, he creates a whimsical and imaginative scenario of what could have been if Newton had pursued his interest in space exploration. He also pays homage to some classic works of literature and science fiction, such as Treasure Island, Gulliver's Travels, and The Martian Chronicles. The story is full of action, adventure, and humor, as well as some clever and insightful references.


The short stories: "The Frog Prince" by Michael F. Flynn, "Paradise Regained" by Edward M. Lerner, "The View from the Top" by Jerry Oltion, "Cryptids" by Alec Nevala-Lee, and "The Whole Truth Witness" by Kenneth Schneyer




Summary and analysis of each short story




"The Frog Prince" is a science fiction fairy tale story that retells the classic story of The Frog Prince with a twist. It is set in a future where humans have colonized other planets and encountered alien life forms. The story follows the relationship between Princess Adelheid, the daughter of the king of New Bavaria, a planet with a medieval culture; and Prince Heinrich, the son of the king of New Prussia, a planet with a high-tech culture. Heinrich has been turned into a frog by an alien witch as a punishment for his arrogance and cruelty. He meets Adelheid when she visits his planet for a diplomatic mission. He convinces her to kiss him and break the spell, but things do not go as planned.


"The Frog Prince" is a charming and clever story that updates and subverts the original fairy tale. The author, Michael F. Flynn, is an American writer who has been publishing stories in Analog Science Fiction and Fact since 1984. He is known for his versatile and eclectic plots, his rich and detailed worldbuilding, and his subtle and sophisticated humor. In this story, he creates a contrast between two different planets and cultures, as well as two different characters and personalities. He also adds some twists and surprises to the plot that make it more interesting and realistic. The story is full of humor, romance, and irony, as well as some moral lessons.


"Paradise Regained" is a science fiction dystopian story that explores the consequences of climate change and genetic engineering. It is set in a future where Earth has become uninhabitable due to global warming, pollution, and overpopulation. The only survivors are those who have escaped to orbital habitats or other planets. The story follows the fate of Adam and Eve, two genetically modified humans who have been created by a mysterious benefactor to repopulate Earth. They are sent to Earth with a spaceship full of supplies and animals. They have to face various challenges and dangers on their new home planet, such as hostile weather, predators, diseases, and loneliness. They also have to deal with their own emotions and doubts.


and Fact. In this story, he creates a realistic and grim scenario of what could happen to Earth and humanity if they do not take care of the environment and their resources. He also creates two sympathetic and complex characters who have to cope with their situation and their destiny. The story is full of drama, tragedy, and hope, as well as some ethical and philosophical questions.


"The View from the Top" is a science fiction comedy story that pokes fun at the clichés and tropes of science fiction. It is set in a future where humans have colonized the moon and Mars, and have encountered alien civilizations. The story follows the exploits of Bob and Alice, two hapless tourists who have won a trip to the top of Olympus Mons, the highest mountain in the solar system. They have to deal with various mishaps and inconveniences on their way to the summit, such as faulty equipment, annoying guides, boring lectures, and unexpected visitors. They also discover some secrets and surprises about the mountain and its history.


"The View from the Top" is a hilarious and clever story that satirizes and parodies science fiction. The author, Jerry Oltion, is an American writer who has been publishing stories in Analog Science Fiction and Fact since 1984. He is known for his humorous and light-hearted stories that involve science fiction and fantasy. He is also a frequent contributor to the Probability Zero department of Analog Science Fiction and Fact, which features short stories that are impossible or improbable. In this story, he creates a contrast between the expectations and realities of space tourism, as well as between the grandeur and absurdity of Olympus Mons. He also makes fun of some common science fiction themes and conventions, such as aliens, conspiracies, ancient civilizations, and superweapons. The story is full of jokes, puns, and references, as well as some twists and turns.


"Cryptids" is a science fiction horror story that explores the concept of cryptozoology and extraterrestrial life. It is set in a present-day where humans have discovered that there are alien creatures living on Earth, hiding in remote and inaccessible places. These creatures are called cryptids, and they are hunted by scientists, adventurers, and thrill-seekers who want to study them or exploit them. The story follows the experience of Dr. Rachel Carson, a biologist who has been hired by a wealthy entrepreneur to capture a cryptid in the Amazon rainforest. She joins a team of experts and mercenaries who have to face various dangers and difficulties on their mission, such as hostile natives, deadly animals, and treacherous terrain. They also have to deal with the cryptid itself, which turns out to be more than they bargained for.


and Fact since 2010. He is known for his hard science fiction stories that involve science, technology, and culture. He is also a novelist and a biographer of science fiction writers. In this story, he creates a realistic and terrifying scenario of what could happen if humans encountered alien life forms on Earth. He also creates a diverse and dynamic cast of characters who have different motives and agendas. The story is full of tension, action, and horror, as well as some scientific and cultural insights.


"The Whole Truth Witness" is a science fiction legal thriller story that explores the concept of memory and truth. It is set in a near future where humans have developed a technology that allows them to record and replay their memories as holograms. These holograms are called whole truth witnesses, and they are used as evidence in court cases. The story follows the trial of James Corcoran, a man who is accused of murdering his wife. His defense lawyer is Susan Chen, who has to prove his innocence by using his whole truth witness. She has to face various obstacles and challenges on her way to the verdict, such as biased judges, corrupt prosecutors, hostile witnesses, and hidden secrets. She also has to deal with her own personal issues, such as her troubled marriage, her ethical dilemmas, and her doubts about her client.


"The Whole Truth Witness" is a gripping and intelligent story that combines science fiction with legal drama. The author, Kenneth Schneyer, is an American writer who has been publishing stories in Analog Science Fiction and Fact since 2013. He is known for his speculative fiction stories that involve law, politics, and philosophy. He is also a lawyer and a professor of legal studies and English. In this story, he creates a plausible and intriguing scenario of what could happen if humans had access to their memories as holograms. He also creates a sympathetic and smart protagonist who has to use her skills and knowledge to win the case. The story is full of twists and turns, as well as some ethical and philosophical questions.


Conclusion




Why you should read Analog Science Fiction and Fact - September 2013




Analog Science Fiction and Fact - September 2013 is a great issue that showcases the diversity and quality of science fiction and fact. It contains stories that cover various genres, themes, styles, and tones, from hard science fiction to historical fantasy, from comedy to horror, from adventure to mystery. It also contains articles that inform and educate readers about science fiction and fact, such as the science fact article by Richard A. Lovett, the guest editorial by Edward M. Lerner, the book review column by Don Sakers, the poetry page by Robert Frazier and Bruce Boston, and the reader's department by Trevor Quachri and others. It is an issue that will appeal to both fans and newcomers of science fiction and fact.


Where to find more information about Analog Science Fiction and Fact




the newsletter, and the contact details. You can also follow them on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. You can also read some of their stories online for free at www.analogsf.com/current-issue. You can also buy their issues in print or digital formats from various retailers such as Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Apple, Google, and Kobo.


I hope you enjoyed this article and found it useful. If you did, please share it with your friends and family who might be interested in science fiction and fact. And if you have any comments or questions, please feel free to leave them below. Thank you for reading!


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Analog Science Fiction and Fact - September 2013:



  • What is the difference between science fiction and science fact?



Science fiction is a genre of literature that imagines what could happen in the future or in an alternative reality, based on science and technology. Science fact is a genre of literature that explains what is happening in the present or in the past, based on science and technology.


  • Who are the writers and editors of Analog Science Fiction and Fact?



The writers of Analog Science Fiction and Fact are mostly professional or amateur authors who submit their stories to the magazine. The editors of Analog Science Fiction and Fact are Trevor Quachri, who is the current editor; Stanley Schmidt, who was the previous editor; and Emily Hockaday, who is the associate editor.


  • How long has Analog Science Fiction and Fact been publishing?



Analog Science Fiction and Fact has been publishing since 1930, under different names and formats. It is one of the oldest and most respected magazines in the science fiction genre.


  • How can I submit my story to Analog Science Fiction and Fact?



You can submit your story to Analog Science Fiction and Fact by following their submission guidelines at www.analogsf.com/information/submissions. They accept stories of various lengths and genres, as long as they are original, realistic, and scientifically accurate. They also accept poetry, articles, editorials, reviews, and features related to science fiction and fact.


  • How can I subscribe to Analog Science Fiction and Fact?



You can subscribe to Analog Science Fiction and Fact by choosing one of their subscription options at www.analogsf.com/subscribe. They offer subscriptions in print or digital formats, for various periods and prices. They also offer gift subscriptions for your friends and family who love science fiction and fact.


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